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Marijuana admissions increased to 17 percent in 2008–Higher than any drug–Cocaine declines

 

This report presents national-level data from the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) for substance abuse treatment admissions in 2008, and trend data for 1998 to 2008. The report provides information on the demographic and substance abuse characteristics of admissions to treatment aged 12 and older for abuse of alcohol and/or drugs in facilities that report to individual State administrative data systems 

Results:

Heroin

Heroin admissions increased from 14 percent of admissions aged 12 and older in 1998 to 16 percent in 2001. They declined to 13 percent in 2007 and 14 percent in 2008

Heroin represented 93 percent of all opiate admissions in 1998 but declined steadily to 71 per­cent in 2008

About two-thirds (68 percent) of primary heroin admissions were male

For primary heroin admissions, the average age at admission was 36 years

More than half (56 percent) of primary heroin admissions were non-Hispanic White, followed by 20 percent each who were of Hispanic origin or were non-Hispanic Black

Sixty-five percent of primary heroin admissions reported injection as the route of administra­tion, and 31 percent reported inhalation

Opiates Other than Heroin

Opiates other than heroin increased from 1 percent of admissions aged 12 and older in 1998 to 6 percent in 2008.

Opiates other than heroin represented 7 percent of all opiate admissions in 1998 but rose to 29 percent in 2008

Just over half (53 percent) of primary non-heroin opiate admissions were male

For primary non-heroin opiate admissions, the average age at admission was 32 years

Most primary non-heroin opiate admissions (89 percent) were non-Hispanic White

More than two-thirds (69 percent) of primary non-heroin opiate admissions reported oral as the route of administration, while 17 percent reported inhalation and 11 percent reported injection [

 Marijuana/Hashish

Marijuana admissions increased from 13 percent in 1998 to 17 percent in 2008

Nearly three-quarters (74 percent) of primary marijuana admissions were male

For primary marijuana admissions, the average age at admission was 24 years

Almost half (49 percent) of primary marijuana admissions were non-Hispanic White, 30 percent were non-Hispanic Black, and 15 percent were of Hispanic origin

Cocaine/Crack

Cocaine admissions declined from 15 percent in 1998 to 11 percent in 2008. Smoked cocaine (crack) represented 71 percent of all primary cocaine admissions in 2008, down from 74 percent in 1998

Fifty-seven percent of primary smoked cocaine admissions were male compared with 65 percent of primary non-smoked cocaine admissions

The average age at admission among smoked cocaine admissions was 40 years, compared with 34 years among non-smoked cocaine admissions

Among primary smoked cocaine admissions, 50 percent were non-Hispanic Black, 39 percent were non-Hispanic White, and 8 percent were of Hispanic origin. Among primary non-smoked cocaine admissions, 52 percent were non-Hispanic White, followed by non-Hispanic Blacks (24 percent) and admissions of Hispanic origin (20 percent)

Eighty-two percent of primary non-smoked cocaine admissions reported inhalation as their route of administration and 10 percent reported injection

Methamphetamine/Amphetamine

Methamphetamine/amphetamine admissions (about 95 percent of these admissions were for methamphetamine in States that reported both) increased from 4 percent of all admissions in 1998 to 9 percent in 2005, but then decreased to 6 percent in 2008

For primary methamphetamine/amphetamine admissions, the average age at admission was 33 years

Fifty-five percent of primary methamphetamine/amphetamine admissions were male

 Almost two-thirds (65 percent) of primary methamphetamine/amphetamine admissions were non-Hispanic White, followed by 21 percent who were of Hispanic origin

 Sixty-six percent of primary methamphetamine/amphetamine admissions reported smoking as the route of administration, 19 percent reported injection, and 9 percent reported inhalation

Source: http://wwwdasis.samhsa.gov/teds08/teds2k8natweb.pdf.

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