42 percent of felony convictions result in a sentence to prison. 33 percent go to jail

Incarceration sentences were almost evenly divided between prison (36%) and jail (37%) in 2009. Felony convictions were more likely to result in a sentence to prison (42%) than jail (33%). Nearly all incarceration sentences for misdemeanor convictions were to jail (53%) rather than prison (3%).

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Mental Health Courts Lower Recidivism

Gentlereaders:  The research continues the generally positive results from speciality courts focusing on an array of criminal justice issues like drugs, probation violations, prisoner reentry and mental health issues.  There is a point where the Department of Justice should take a harder look as to why so many court-related programs are claiming success. In all probability, […]

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Riddled with deeply troubling problems. Crime in America.Net.

What happens when a major player in the criminal justice system breaks ranks with their partners? According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, “That’s what happened when  Former District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham, stung by reports that her office had consistently low conviction rates, defended her performance Monday and criticized the rest of the city’s criminal justice […]

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Do Drug Courts Work? Crime News-Crime in America.Net

Crime in America.Net We posted an article on a 20 year study of a successful offender-based treatment program addressing an effort to teach criminal offenders to change their thinking patterns (Cognitive Based Therapy) as to how they dealt with life’s issues (i.e., you don’t use violence to solve everyday problems). We received reader inquiries as to additional […]

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Crime Statistics: No Prison Sentences for Most Felony Convictions

  We appreciate your opinions at http://crimeinamerica.net Gentlereaders:  A student was asking about incarceration in the United States. He is aware that the United States is the world’s leader in rates of incarceration per a number of sources. According to the New York Times: “The United States has less than 5 percent of the world’s […]

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Supreme Court–Highest Ratings Since 2001

Supreme Court–Gallup Poll   Do you approve or disapprove of the way the Supreme Court is handling its job?   Approve Disapprove No opinion   % % % 2009 Aug 31-Sep 2 61 28 11 2009 Jun 14-17 59 30 11 2008 Sep 8-11 50 39 11 2008 Jun 9-12 48 38 14 2007 Sep […]

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Swift and Certain: Hawaii’s Probation Experiment

Governing Magazine A maverick judge stresses mild but immediate punishment. By John Buntin | November 2009 More Like This Talk Show Helps Deadbeat Dads The Bench and the Ballot Box Robe Warriors The Corruption Puzzle Uneven Stimulus Steven Alm was no courtroom novice when he started handling felony cases as a circuit judge in Hawaii. […]

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Mental Health Courts Show Promise in Reducing Criminal Behavior

Dear Colleagues: The section of this report on recidivism indicates that mental health courts reduce future criminality. While the evidence is preliminary, it plus data on drug courts suggests that the judiciary has a role to play in crime control.  Crime in America.Net Martha Plotkin: (240) 482-8579, mplotkin@csg.org Elizabeth Dodd: (646)383-5749, edodd@csg.org September 24, 2009 […]

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A Message from President Barack Obama Regarding Judge Sonia Sotomayor

Good Morning, Yesterday, Judge Sonia Sotomayor made her opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee and moved another step closer to taking a seat on the United States Supreme Court. As President, there are few responsibilities more serious or consequential than the naming of a Supreme Court Justice, so I want to take this opportunity […]

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Attorney General Holder’s Remarks- Rethinking Federal Sentencing Policy

Attorney General Holder’s Remarks for the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice and Congressional Black Caucus Symposium “Rethinking Federal Sentencing Policy 25th Anniversary of the Sentencing Reform Act” Washington, D.C. Wednesday, June 24, 2009 Congressman Conyers, thank you for your kind introduction. It is my pleasure to join this esteemed group of federal […]

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